How to cultivate more curiosity in the classroom

Popular media can inspire a culture of curiosity in the classroom. How? By building on students’ personal prior knowledge of known movie clips to create a sense of relatability and understanding in an engaging, responsive manner. Using content from TV shows and movies can ease students into new educational lessons and make the academic content easier to digest. With clips from ClassHook, educators can introduce students to lessons as a hook to gain their interest and spark their curiosity.

How can popular media create or inspire a culture of curiosity in the classroom? 

Here are our top three ideas:

  1. Movie clips get students interested in learning more about the topic
  2. Analysis of movie/TV clips leads to a positive impression of the topic
  3. Tapping into students’ personal prior knowledge with movie clips encourages new connections and ideas

Movie clips get students interested in learning more about the topic

One college professor uses the ClassHook platform to find engaging videos on entrepreneurship to evoke a sense of approachable understanding with students. After speaking with a couple of the students, we gained insight into their opinions; watching familiar popular media clips is a more effective and engaging way to convey lessons. Out of the three students we spoke with, all preferred the use of popular media to support and further explain educational lessons. Students have found that the opportunity to relate to the mannerisms of how a lesson is being taught is more memorable.

Here are some comments from college students who have been taught using ClassHook:

My professor always uses ClassHook’s clips to clarify his lessons and it honestly is such a lifesaver when explaining tricky subjects. It also just makes it easier to understand when it’s from a show that everyone in the class watches.

I finally was able to understand the marketing concept of perceived value and the importance of driving demand with high supply because of The Office.

Analysis of movie/TV clips leads to a positive impression of the topic

Diving into an analysis of a familiar movie or TV clip is likely to result in a positive impression of the topic as well as a stronger memory and understanding of the lesson. Popular media allows educators to present topics in a more playful light, making the concepts more relatable and understandable.

Students typically not only find the popular media clips more engaging and entertaining but also more enriching and inspiring. Whether it is learning about the difficulties of entrepreneurship or gaining insight into new innovative ventures or so many more topics, students grasp concepts more easily since the clips revolve around TV shows and movies that are relatable and easy to understand. ClassHook offers numerous popular media clips that demonstrate educational lessons and encourage students to let their creativity flow. 

Tapping into students’ personal prior knowledge with movie clips encourages new connections and ideas

Tapping into what students already know can encourage them to make relations and connections to what they are learning. Teachers can use this as their students’ strengths by using our Live Discussions feature or Pause Prompts to encourage their students’ thought processes and questions. To further support educators in cultivating curiosity, ClassHook also provides use cases that allow students to discuss abstract concepts and see educational lessons in a real-world context.

ClassHook presents teachers, students and educators with ample resources of popular media clips that provide educational lessons on any topic for a wide range of grade levels. Popular media also creates a sense of inspiration and curiosity in the classroom. As students gain knowledge from ClassHook’s videos, it’s more likely to be more comfortable and curious around certain topics. A culture of curiosity in the classroom is contagious to other students and will continue to inspire new ideas and discussions. 

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